Gallery on Daily Paintworks

If you have been wanting to add any of my little (or big!) paintings to your collection and wondering how — I now have a convenient spot to find and purchase them on Daily Paintworks. They accept PayPal, and I can ship anywhere in the U.S., and maybe even further away once I research that. If you are outside of the U.S., please contact me and we’ll see how that could work.

https://www.dailypaintworks.com/Artists/micaela-marsden-14063

I am accepting commissions for portraits of children as well. Please contact me by comment here, or DM me on Facebook or Instagram. Thank you!

images of various artworks.
Advertisement

a portrait series…

This has been turning into a series. Not a series related to each other in any way other than that they are all of children loved by others, who would like to see their dear faces frequently. I feel a bit Beatrix Potter saying “dear faces”, but that is kind of how you feel, especially as a grandparent. While in the midst of parenting, I know it is much more difficult to see the forest for the trees. Sadly, but there it is!

Vegetable entertainment

I’ve been pressing my fruits and vegetables into service in the interest of getting frequent painting warm ups. These slim but fiery red peppers are deceptively compact, they deliver a powerful heat, and the white pepper is new to me. The red ones might be Thai peppers. White = sweet pepper, or maybe a bell? I’ll find out how hot is is when I slice it for cooking!

Since I have a light bulb with changing colors, just for fun I thought to try doing one scene with these same vegetables with different color cast shadows. There seems to be no color in my palette which matches either of the cast shadows, or maybe I just don’t know how to do that yet. If you have any insights, please share them!

This pepper painting started out as a 20-minute study. 8×10
the colored lights were overall darker than a plain white. 8×10

The challenge of capturing children

Finding simple things to do in these days of staying at home a lot. Drawing and painting has been my #1 go-to, since it’s easily done within your home with just a minimum of space. “Simple” may not be an accurate description, maybe “elemental” is more like it. It feels direct, and the outcome is entirely up to you.

A few months ago, I participated in 30faces30days from sktchy art school. One day we were presented with the face of a baby—a difficult subject! You might think it would be easy, but to keep the lines brief and accurate, to show the sweetness is very difficult, at least for me. “There is no growth without pain” they say; this was pretty tolerable in the pain department, though hopefully enough to learn something.

I got through that one, and it inspired me to try some in oil paint as well.

Above is the baby’s face from sktchy. So droll, the old man look for sure.
A baby with fun hair, this one in oils.

sketch—shadows of large objects

Ha! Shadows can be so much fun – something not really there which is visible! In this case, the Carquinez Bridge provided the structure to obstruct the sun. This bridge is composed of an old trestle-ish looking bridge for going North, and the new graceful Southward bridge. I might add a few more pencil lines.

oil sketch of the Carquinez Bridge and shadows

a goat among the grapes

This vineyard painting was beginning in an abstract way, but I didn’t know where to go next. I thought of completing it as a traditional plein air painting, but I really liked the graphic stripes that were there — so I split the difference and added a goat painted in a loose way, with some unusual colors.

the goat in the vineyard
a Fainting Goat

Italian Cypresses

This road wound its way through vineyards, fields, farmlands to arrive to a hunting lodge in the Tuscany hills, of Italy. From my first trip to Italy to paint for a week at an old farm turned agriturismo. It was the most delightful trip and great introduction to Italy’s lovely northern countryside – and food! I was never an Italian food aficionado until visiting and tasting the real thing. This painting has gone through some changes – as the years pass I see things I want to change. This latest iteration is much brighter than earlier ones. You sometimes lose something you like, but often gain something else. The future may hold more versions…!